Voting can be confusing af, we know. So we’re here to break it down for you. Get all the info you need to be a 2020 voter!

Like most things in life – voting is better with friends! So bring yours and let’s #VoteTogether. Join us for food, drinks, ~swag~ music, and good times before we head on over to our campus polling place. Find an event near you!

WTF is a primary??

In a primary, voters get to pick who their chosen political party will put on the ballot for the general election in November. Your ballot will have all sorts of things on it – from President, to US Senate, to Congress and a bunch of critical local elections.

We recommend pulling up your ballot at VOTE411.org before you head to the voting booth and see who’s on there and who reflects your values!

Find more cool and fun voting information at GoVoteTexas.org and find your polling place –> here <—

WTF is
a primary??

In a primary, voters get to pick who their chosen political party will put on the ballot for the general election in November. Your ballot will have all sorts of things on it – from President, to US Senate, to Congress and a bunch of critical local elections.

We recommend pulling up your ballot at VOTE411.org before you head to the voting booth and see who’s on there and who reflects your values!

Find more cool and fun voting information at GoVoteTexas.org and find your polling place –> here <—

Block out some space on your calendar for votin' time!
  • Last day to register to vote for this primary election: Feb. 3
  • First day of early voting: Feb. 18
  • Last day to apply for a mail-in ballot: Feb. 21
  • Last day to early vote: Feb. 28
  • Election day: *March 3*

Lines can get long on election day, so why wait? Head to the polls during early voting and avoid the wait.

Depending on what county you live in, you may have to vote within your precinct which is listed on your voter registration card or at a county-wide voting center. You can also find your precinct and voting location corresponding to your precinct two days before election day via the Secretary of State website. You may also call your elections office for this information. Find your Voter Registrar office here.

What do I bring to vote?

You don’t need much to vote, but it’s important that you bring your ID. Let’s say it again, BRING YOUR ID. Driver’s license or state ID, regardless, BRING IT.  If you don’t have either, look to all the forms of identification you may use listed below:

  • Driver license
  • Texas Election Identification Certificate
  • Texas personal identification card issued by DPS
  • Texas license to carry a handgun issued by DPS
  • United States military identification card containing the person’s photograph
  • United States citizenship certificate containing the person’s photograph
  • United States passport

If you don’t have any of the above, but know you are registered, you can sign a “declaration of reasonable impediment” and vote a regular ballot by presenting one of the following:

  • Valid voter registration certificate (card)
  • Certified birth certificate (original)
  • Current utility bill
  • Bank statement
  • Government check
  • Paycheck
  • Any other government document with the individual’s name and address (original)

Wait! My address on my ID is different than where I registered to vote!!!
That’s okay as long as your name is the same.

Difficulties at the polls?

Sometimes shit happens at the polls that doesn’t feel right, but don’t worry – we have friends for that. Amazing lawyers run a hotline for anyone that has issues at the ballot box, don’t hesitate to reach out.

Registered voters without photo ID but present the alternate documents listed above and sign the declaration form can vote a regular ballot. If you are still experiencing difficulties or are being questioned about your voter registration status you may call one of the following:

  • (866) OUR-VOTE
    English
  • (888) VE-Y-VOTA
    Spanish
  • (888) API-VOTE
    Mandarin, Cantonese, Korean, Vietnamese, Bengali, Urdu, Hindi, and Tagalog