It’s Election time! No, it’s not deja vu. Cities and municipalities across Texas are preparing [yet again] to get a say in local races, both citywide and statewide. At MOVE Texas, we’re all about local democracy, it’s where we started out, and we want to make sure you know everything you need to know to weigh in and cast your vote.


But I thought we just had an election?

Right? They never end! A big part of the commitment to being a lifelong voter is recognizing there’s always something to vote on if we really want to invest in the betterment of our communities. This election season, the big focus is the Texas Constitutional Amendment Election. The state is proposing eight amendments that you get to vote for to help literally make the law of this huge chunk of land. Other than this statewide election, your ballot may have other municipal races and ballot propositions.

Refresher: Municipal Election is an election held within a city, town, or rural municipality to elect local representatives, such as mayors, city council members, and school boards, as well as vote on ballot propositions.

Civics 101: A ballot proposition is a mechanism that gives voters the opportunity to introduce initiatives or to get a direct say in the direction they think their city should take on a specific issue. It could look like a bond election, a referendum, or a charter amendment, and it’s generally placed on the ballot for either the approval or rejection of the voters. [There are no runoffs for propositions] 

Boy, for a state that makes it so hard to vote, we sure do love elections!


EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO MAKE A PLAN TO VOTE

Important Point : The deadline to register for the Nov. 2 Constitutional Amendment Election was Oct. 4, 2021. Click here to check if you’re registered to vote! 

EARLY VOTING

Only cuties vote early (if you vote early you’re a cutie, that’s the rule). It’s the best, most flexible, and absolute safest way to vote! 

  • Begins Monday, Oct. 18 and goes on through Friday, Oct. 29.
VOTING BY MAIL

According to the Texas Secretary of State (the person in charge of our elections), you are eligible to vote by mail if you are:

  • 65 years or older
  • Disabled 
  • Out of the county on election day and during the period for early voting by personal appearance
  • Confined in jail, but otherwise eligible

The deadline to apply for a vote by mail ballot is Friday, Oct. 22. To be clear, your county election’s department must receive your application by the deadline. Find an application here. Once you receive your ballot after you apply, make sure it is returned to your county’s elections department by no later than Nov. 3 at 5 p.m. 

ELECTION DAY

We’re celebrating vaccines as much as you are, but remember y’all we’re still in a whole pandemic. Although we wish the state could have done more for you, sadly so many will still have to choose between their health and their vote come Election Day. If you choose to go to the polls, once again, wear your mask, wear gloves, bring hand sanitizer, bring your own pen, and keep your distance. 

  • Election Day: Tuesday, Nov. 2

If you see your county on this list, yeehaw! It means your county participates in the “countywide polling place program” which is a fancy way of saying you can vote at *any* polling place in your county on Election Day, not just at your assigned precinct location. Yay for pro-voter convenience.

You’ve made it this far – you can have a lil playlist as a treat! We put together some of our favorite Texans to listen to while you’re in line to vote. Thanks for being a voter!

WHAT YOU NEED TO BRING

All you’ll need to actually vote is a little time out of your day one valid form of I.D. The acceptable forms of ID are 

  • Texas Driver License 
  • Texas Election Certificate
  • Texas Personal I.D.
  • Texas Handgun License 
  • U.S. Military I.D. (w/ picture)
  • Citizenship or Naturalization Certificate (w/ picture)
  • U.S. Passport (book or card)

If you don’t have access to any of these, you can request a “Reasonable Impediment Declaration” and present any one of these alternative forms of identification:

  • Birth Certificate
  • Current Utility Bill 
  • Government Check
  • Paycheck 
  • Any other government document with your name and address


How do I get there?

No ride, no problem. Our friends at RideShare2Vote can help ya out with a *free* round trip to the polls and back. Just make sure you request your ride 2 hours in advance!

You can either

1.) Download their app RideShare2Vote on the Google or Apple store

2.) Call their toll free number (888) 977-2250

3.) Request a ride using this link: https://rideshare2vote.com/upgrade/request-a-ride/#webrequest 

What Am I Voting For?

We got you! Like we said, this is the Constitutional Amendment Election. This is a big deal, but not many people are hip to how important it is to vote in this election. The proposed Texas Constitutional Amendments are the deep cuts of democracy.

Because we’ve overly committed to this metaphor, we’ll be pairing an underrated song with each proposed amendment so you get the information you need – and a playlist for good measure. 

We’ll give you the proposition’s original language, a song pairing and justification, an explanation of the proposed amendment, and an idea of the arguments for and against it. There’s only eight, so it won’t take long. And then throw in your airpods, turn up the playlist, and VOTE, dammit. Head over to our Deep Cut The Vote webpage for all this goodness!

Austin’s Prop A

On Tuesday, Oct. 12, we announced we were joining a coalition of over 100 community organizations in opposition to Austin’s Proposition A. We are saying #NoWayOnPropA. Here’s why:

  • This unfunded mandate that will force Austin to spend hundreds of millions $$$ more on the police department each year.

  • It would lead to tax increases for working Austinites

  • It would fund what is already the highest funded police force per resident ($442M) than any other major city in Texas.

  • It would force the city to lay off firefighters, medics, and 911 call takers

  • It would cut services like parks, pools, and libraries

  • It would skirt other services of public safety in favor of hiring hundreds of new policeIt would not include de-escalation training, anti-discrimination training, mental health training

This is not how we protect public safety. Don’t be deceived by feel-good words like training and diversity. Read the fine print and follow the money. Learn more below.